SMBleedingGhost Writeup Part II: Unauthenticated Memory Read – Preparing the Ground for an RCE

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Follow zecops

Introduction

In our previous blog post, we demonstrated how the SMBGhost bug (CVE-2020-0796) can be exploited for local privilege escalation. A brief reminder: CVE-2020-0796, also known as “SMBGhost”, is a bug in the compression mechanism of SMBv3.1.1. The bug affects Windows 10 versions 1903 and 1909, and it was announced and patched by Microsoft about 3 months ago. In the previous blog post we mentioned that although the Microsoft Security Advisory describes the bug as a Remote Code Execution (RCE) vulnerability, there is no public POC that demonstrates RCE through this bug. This was true until chompie1337 released the first public RCE POC, based on the writeup of Ricerca Security. Our POC uses a different method, and doesn’t involve physical memory access. Instead, we use the SMBleed (CVE-2020-1206) bug to help with the exploitation.

Hear the news first

  • Only essential content
  • New vulnerabilities & announcements
  • News from ZecOps Research Team
We won’t spam, pinky swear 🤞

Aiming for RCE

Our previous research led to the local privilege escalation attack that we have shown in our previous writeup. SMBGhost can be used for an RCE attack and we aim to demonstrate how we achieved it in this series of blog posts. As we showed in the previous writeup, we were able to implement a remote write-what-where primitive. However, for an RCE capability we need to know where to write the arbitrary data. Since most of the memory layout in the modern Windows versions is randomized, having the ability to write arbitrary data in any location is still very limiting. While searching for another capability to assist with the attack, we discovered a new bug in Microsoft’s SMB implementation. For technical details and a POC, check out our recent publication. We named it SMBleed since it allows to leak parts of memory remotely, similar to Heartbleed, just via SMB. While the concept is similar and an authenticated user can read large blocks of uninitialized data, the attack surface without authentication is more limited. Since we aimed for an unauthenticated RCE exploitation, the first thing we looked for is a way to read memory unauthenticated.

Diving into SMB

Note: The following sections describe in detail a technique we were able to use for exploitation, but dumped in favor of a different approach which worked better in our case. Still, it’s an approach that we felt is worth sharing. If you prefer to stick to what ended up in our final POC, you can just read Observation #1 and Observation #2, and then skip to the A different approach – decompression section.

The SMBleed bug allows an attacker to send a message such that its beginning is controlled by the attacker, while the rest of the message contains uninitialized data which is treated as a part of the message. For an authenticated user, there’s an easy way to exploit this using the SMB2 WRITE message to write uninitialized data to a file, and then read it with the SMB2 READ command. We started by looking for a similar technique for an unauthenticated user – a way to send a message such that a part of it can be retrieved later.

After skimming over the protocol specification and debugging a couple of sessions, we saw that a regular flow begins with the following commands that are sent by the client:

SMB2 NEGOTIATE → SMB2 SESSION_SETUP → SMB2 SESSION_SETUP

If incorrect credentials are used, the session is aborted after the second SMB2 SESSION_SETUP request.

We assume that we don’t have valid credentials, so we checked whether other commands can be sent without authentication. We found the following after some experimentation:

  • The first command to be sent must be SMB2 NEGOTIATE. It also must be the only SMB2 NEGOTIATE command during the session.
  • The subsequent commands, until authentication completes successfully, must be SMB2 SESSION_SETUP. That is unless anonymous access to named pipes or shares is not restricted, and it is by default.

Since the SMB2 NEGOTIATE message is not compressed (the compression algorithm, if any, is decided during the negotiation), all that’s left is SMB2 SESSION_SETUP. So we took a closer look at the format of the SMB2 SESSION_SETUP message, hoping to find a way to get some of the data that is being sent back.

A closer look at SMB2 SESSION_SETUP

As we’ve already mentioned, a regular session that we observed sends two SMB2 SESSION_SETUP commands. At first, we checked whether one of the replies to these messages sends back some of the data. If that was the case, we could try to craft a message such that the data is left uninitialized. Unfortunately, we didn’t find such data. We couldn’t find a way to affect the first response, and the second response had an empty body and the 0xC000006D (STATUS_LOGON_FAILURE) status in the packet header (remember, we assume we don’t have valid credentials). The first SMB2 SESSION_SETUP request contains an NTLM Negotiate message, and the second SMB2 SESSION_SETUP request contains an NTLM Authenticate message. The former is rather simple, and we weren’t able to use it for something interesting, so we focused on the latter.

The NTLM Authenticate message

After studying the NTLM Authenticate message we came to the conclusion that the message’s most complex part, which is the best fit for misuse, is the NTLM2 V2 Response structure. It’s a  variable-length byte array, mostly consisting of the NTLMv2_CLIENT_CHALLENGE structure. We noticed that if the structure doesn’t pass some of the initial checks, the 0xC000000D (STATUS_INVALID_PARAMETER) parameter is returned instead of 0xC000006D (STATUS_LOGON_FAILURE). Some of these checks are verifying the AvPairs field.

The AvPairs field is a variable-length byte array that contains a sequence of AV_PAIR structures. Each AV_PAIR structure defines an attribute/value pair. The attribute is defined by the AvId field, the AvLen field defines the value’s length in bytes, and the Value field is a variable-length byte-array that contains the value itself. An item with the attribute MsvAvEOL and a zero length marks the end of the array.

AvPairs inside the SMB2 packet.

The authentication message is handled by the SsprHandleAuthenticateMessage function in the msv1_0.dll module. Among the initial checks, the function makes sure that the AvPairs array contains the following attributes: 0x0001 (MsvAvNbComputerName), 0x0002 (MsvAvNbDomainName). The value is not checked. The check itself is done by traversing the array and checking whether the requested attribute exists, and whether its length is within the struct. If the length is too large, the traversal is stopped. So practically, the MsvAvEOL item is not required for the NTLM Authenticate message to be valid.

At this point we figured that we can craft a request that can provide an answer to the following question: Given two bytes at offset x, interpreted as uint16, is the value larger than y? x and y are controlled by us. Consider the following packet:

The content of value 0x0001 (MsvAvNbComputerName) doesn’t matter, so we can use it to adjust the offset of the second value. For the second value, we only set the attribute as 0x0002 (MsvAvNbDomainName), leaving the length and the value uninitialized. We also set the size of the whole packet so that there are y bytes that follow the length field. There are two possible outcomes depending on the uninitialized value of the length field of the second value:

  • length <= y: In this case the check passes, since a valid 0x0002 (MsvAvNbDomainName) value is found. The server returns 0xC000006D (STATUS_LOGON_FAILURE) since the credentials are incorrect.
  • length > y: In this case the check fails, since the second value has an invalid length and is discarded. The server returns 0xC000000D (STATUS_INVALID_PARAMETER) for this case.

According to the server response we can deduce the answer to our question.

So, now we can get this small piece of information, right? Not so fast. Unfortunately, the NTLM Authenticate message is limited to 0xB48 bytes, and is discarded if it’s larger than that. The check is done by the SspContextGetMessage function in the msv1_0.dll module. Can we solve this problem by leaving only one of the two length bytes uninitialized? Unfortunately not, since the uint16 value is encoded as little endian, and to the best of our knowledge at this point, we can only leave the second, significant byte uninitialized, which doesn’t help too much. Unable to achieve something better within a single SMB session, we looked at what else can be done.

Observation #1: Lookaside lists

As we already mentioned in our previous research, the modules that handle SMB in the kernel (srv2.sys and srvnet.sys) use a custom allocation function, SrvNetAllocateBuffer, exported by srvnet.sys. This function uses lookaside lists for small allocations as an optimization. Lookaside lists are used for effectively reserving a set of reusable, fixed-size buffers for the driver.

The lookaside lists are created upon initialization, a list for each size and logical processor, as depicted in the following table:

→ Allocation size

Logical Processor
0x1100 0x2100 0x4100 0x8100 0x10100 0x20100 0x40100 0x80100 0x100100
Processor 1 📝 📝 📝 📝 📝 📝 📝 📝 📝
Processor 2 📝 📝 📝 📝 📝 📝 📝 📝 📝
Processor n 📝 📝 📝 📝 📝 📝 📝 📝 📝

Each cell with the “📝” symbol is a separate lookaside list. To simplify our analysis, we’ll assume our target has only one logical processor (we’ll cover targets with more than one logical processor in the third part of the writeup). In this case, as long as the same amount of bytes is allocated, the same lookaside list is used, and the same allocated buffer is reused again and again. We can use this implementation detail to have some control over the uninitialized data, as we’ll see soon.

Observation #2: Failing the decompression

Let’s revisit what happens when a compressed packet is decompressed (refer to our previous research for more details and pseudocode):

In case CompressedData is invalid, the decompression stage fails, the copy stage is not executed, and the connection is dropped. But the decompression might fail only after extracting a part of CompressedData which is valid. This allows us to craft a request such that data of our choice will be written at an offset of our choice, like this:

Back to the NTLM Authenticate message

We can use the above observations to make our technique work by using two steps:

  1. Send a message with an invalid compressed data such that only a single zero byte is extracted. That byte will be the most significant byte of the length of the second value in the AvPairs array.
  2. Send a message just as before, but make sure that the same lookaside list is used for the allocation, so that the zero byte will be there.

This time, this technique can answer the following question: Given a byte at offset x, is the value larger than y? As before, x and y are controlled by us.

Since we can re-use the buffer again and again by making sure the same lookaside list is used, we can repeat the steps several times while changing y, and finally deduce the byte value at a given offset.

Unfortunately, this technique has a limitation – the offset of the byte we can read is limited to 0xADB bytes from the beginning of the packet buffer. That’s because the offset of the NTLM Authenticate message (AUTHENTICATE_MESSAGE) is limited to 0x40 bytes after the end of the SMB2 SESSION_SETUP headers (enforced by the Smb2ValidateSessionSetup function in srv2.sys), and the size of the NTLM Authenticate message (AUTHENTICATE_MESSAGE) is limited to 0xB48 bytes, as we already mentioned.

Overcoming the offset limitation

Let’s say that we want to read a byte at offset 0x1100 (we’ll see why we want to go that far in the third part of the writeup). We can’t do it directly with our technique, but we found the following solution: since the buffers get reused from the lookaside lists, we can “lift up” the target byte via the decompression function by setting the Offset field to point beyond that byte. We just need to make sure that the data that is located there can be interpreted as valid compressed data, otherwise the copying won’t happen.

The incoming packet buffer contains extra 16 header bytes which aren’t copied over when the decompression takes place. As a result, the copied data, including the target byte, is copied to a location 16 bytes closer to the beginning of the allocated buffer. We can repeat that several times, until the target byte offset is low enough.

Address leak POC

You can find a script that demonstrates the above technique here. Remember that we assumed that the target computer has only one logical processor, so you’ll have to configure your VM properly to get the script working. If all goes well, the script will read and print an address from the NonPagedPoolNx pool. In fact, that would be the address of one of the buffers residing in one of the lookaside lists.

A different approach – decompression

While advancing with our research, we realized that the decompressed SMB packet is not the only complex structure that can be invalid in various ways. Even before handling all of the SMB-related structures, the compressed buffer can be invalid as well. If the decompression fails, the connection is dropped, which can be detected.

Microsoft’s SMB implementation offers three compression algorithms to choose from: LZNT1, Plain LZ77 and LZ77+Huffman. We looked at LZNT1 since it’s the first in the list, and it’s rather simple – about 80 Python lines for a decompression function. Without diving too much into details, the compressed data consists of a sequence of compressed blocks, each beginning with a uint16 variable marking its length. When a length of zero is encountered, the decompression completes (similar to a NULL-terminated string, but it’s optional). Also, conveniently, a range of zero bytes represents valid compressed data. With the above, we managed to answer the same question as we did with the previous approach: Given a byte at offset x, is the value larger than y? Here, too, x and y are controlled by us.

We accomplished that by sending a valid packed which is followed by a range of bytes similar to the following (note that it’s a simplification, the actual byte values are a bit different):

There are two possible outcomes depending on the uninitialized value of the least significant byte of the length field:

  • length <= y: In this case the whole compressed block will consist out of zero bytes, which is completely valid, and the next block’s length will be zero, completing the decompression successfully. The server will return a response.
  • length > y: In this case, either the first or the second compression block will contain 0xFF bytes, which will fail the decompression. The server will drop the connection.

Just like with the previous technique, we can use observations #1 and #2 to craft a message with an uninitialized byte in the middle of the message by using two steps:

  1. Send a message with invalid compressed data such that only the part we need is extracted. The bytes that will be extracted are the bytes in the image above.
  2. Send a second message, but make sure that the same lookaside list is used for the allocation, so that the bytes from step 1 will be there.

Note that the Offset value in the SMB packet header will point to the compressed data, which can be valid or not depending on the value of the initialized byte. The valid SMB packet will be sent uncompressed. Note also that since the Offset value is larger than the message itself, there’s an overflow in the calculation of the compressed data size, which ends up being a huge number. Usually that’s not an issue since the decompression ends quickly, either successfully or not. But sometimes the system crashes due to an out of bounds read. We didn’t try to solve this since it happens rarely, and the POC is complex enough.

The most notable advantage of this technique compared to the previous one is that there’s no offset limitation anymore. Even though we managed to overcome the limitation, it required sending a large number of packets, hurting performance and stability.

ZecOps Detection

ZecOps classify forensics logs related to this issue as the following tags #SMBGhost and #SMBleed. You can find more information on how to use ZecOps solutions for Endpoints & Servers, Mobile devices, or applications.

Remediation

You can remediate the impact of both issues by doing one of the following:

  • Applying the latest security issues (recommended)
  • Block port 445 / enforce host-isolation
  • Disable SMBv3.1.1 compression

Part II – Summary

In this part, we described how we managed to read uninitialized data from the kernel pool, remotely and without authentication, by exploiting SMBGhost and SMBleed. In the third part we’ll show how it helped us achieve RCE.

Hear the news first

  • Only essential content
  • New vulnerabilities & announcements
  • News from ZecOps Research Team
We won’t spam, pinky swear 🤞
reverse bounty

Researcher? Analyst?

If you get excited about exploits reproduction like we do, you would love ZecOps Reverse Bounty program - details ahead!

Join Reverse Bounty™ >

Partners, Resellers, Distributors and Innovative Security Teams

ZecOps provides the industry-first automated crash forensics platform across devices, operating systems and applications. Learn more about what we do and get our one pager.

Get One Pager >

SHARE THIS ARTICLE